In many cases, fastening civil engineering utilities is a complex process. You often need to think of many things including the longevity of the utilities, as well as how much it will cost you to use various forms of fastening. In addition to that, you also need to consider the fact that there are other […]

In many cases, fastening civil engineering utilities is a complex process. You often need to think of many things including the longevity of the utilities, as well as how much it will cost you to use various forms of fastening. In addition to that, you also need to consider the fact that there are other technical considerations you may need to make, including the environment in which the fasteners are likely to be used.
One of the emerging issues that people are likely to fuss over in coming times is the environmental impact of such fastening processes. It’s important to note that many governments are now taking environmental conservation very seriously. If you are charged with the task of fastening civil engineering utilities, there are a number of things you can do to reduce the environmental impact that this will have. Some of these include:

The use of recycled fasteners

maintain eco-friendliness civil engineering
If you are going to use fasteners such as aluminum hex nuts or steel hex head cap screws, you might as well ensure that they are recycled. This way, you can be sure that the environmental impact of using them is not so great. A large number of fastener manufacturers are focusing on using recycled raw materials for manufacture of such products. This means that you should not have much trouble in finding such products.
However, you may need to be specific about your requirements when you are shopping for them. For instance, once you have identified a specific vendor, it would be wise to ask them if they make their products from recycled material. You should not assume that all fastener manufacturing firms do this.

 

Controlling the number of fasteners used

When installing civil engineering utilities, it would be wise to get an accurate estimate of how many fasteners you will need. This way, you won’t need to order more than you need. This will reduce wastage which will have a positive impact on the environment in the long term. In addition to that, it is also likely to reduce the cost of the project. The only way to get an accurate and reliable figure would be by working with established quantity survey firms. The more experience they have, the more accurate they are likely to be.

Reducing wastage

You may need to focus on ways of reducing the number of fasteners wasted during the installation process. For instance, the use of wrong tools or techniques for the fastening is likely to lead to increased wastage. To avoid this, you should ensure that everyone involved in the project is trained for it. In addition to that, you should also insist on the use of proper tools for the job. In addition to reducing waste, this will also reduce the amount of time needed to complete the project. For more help in which tools you may need for the installation, you could consult the fastener vendors you have bought from. Some of them could even rent out the equipment to you if need be.
By doing the above, you will definitely reduce the amount of wastage associated with the use of fasteners in civil engineering.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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