With the rise in the use of many types of electronics in this day and age, the printed circuit board is one of the most commonly used components in most industries. This type of device is used to control nearly all devices, especially consumer electronics. If you are a manufacturer involved in the creation of […]

With the rise in the use of many types of electronics in this day and age, the printed circuit board is one of the most commonly used components in most industries. This type of device is used to control nearly all devices, especially consumer electronics. If you are a manufacturer involved in the creation of such items, it therefore makes sense for you to ensure that the fastening of printed circuit boards is done correctly.
There are a number of reasons why this is so. For one, the fact that such boards are central to the functioning of any electronics means that they need to be designed well. When there are any flaws in design, it means that the circuit boards are likely not to work well, and that the customer is less likely to be satisfied. Given the fact that there is a lot of competition in this industry, this will definitely not bode well for any manufacturer. Using the wrong aluminum Phillips truss screws or Inconel hex head nuts should be avoided. Some of the ways of identifying the best fasteners for printed circuit board installation include:

The issue of size

You need to make sure that you pick fasteners whose size is ideal for the type of printed circuit board you are manufacturing. This might require you to consult both an electronic engineer and the firm that supplies you with the fasteners. The goal is to make sure that you never compromise the quality of the printed circuit boards by getting fasteners that are either too large or too small. In either case, you might end up damaging the circuit boards during installation.
Printed Circuit Board and fastener use

Electrical conductivity

You also need to consider the issue of electrical conductivity of the fasteners. You need to first identify whether you want the bolts and nuts to be electrically conductive, and then get ones that meet your needs. For instance, if there is a risk of electrocution or damaging the printed circuit board by shorting, you might need to use fasteners that are not very good conductors.

 

Weight considerations

Weight can sometimes be an important factor in determining the best types of fasteners to use for printed circuit board design. This is especially so if you are to use a large number of them at the same time. You might need to get fasteners made out of a material that is lightweight if this is a very important consideration.

Grip

You want the fasteners to keep the printed circuit board in place strongly. Too much motion could result in damage to the sensitive components of the circuit board. To this end, using self-expanding fasteners is always indicated, since this ensures that any movement is limited. Most of the self-expanding fasteners are also self-clinching, which makes them easier to install.
In summary, there are many considerations you need to keep in mind when picking printed circuit board fasteners. Consider them, and you will have a much easier time doing a high quality installation for the circuit boards!

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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