During any construction process, it is usually necessary to do as much as possible to ensure that the cost of the process is kept at a minimum. The basis for doing this makes a lot of sense, but the way in which you get it done can have a negative impact on the overall outcome […]

During any construction process, it is usually necessary to do as much as possible to ensure that the cost of the process is kept at a minimum. The basis for doing this makes a lot of sense, but the way in which you get it done can have a negative impact on the overall outcome of the project. For instance, one of the things you can entertain to try and cut down on the cost of construction is by reusing some of the bolts and screws you need for construction. In addition to being cheaper than buying new fasteners, it also helps in reducing waste as well.

The danger with using fasteners that have structural problems
However, you need to keep in mind that simply using items such as Monel 400 carriage bolts and Alloy 20 hex head cap screws can do more harm than good. Sometimes, such fasteners are used in such a manner that their structure has been subjected to too much tension. When they exceed their plastic limit, they tend to deform permanently, which means that they will not hold two surfaces or objects in closed proximity at all. This often leads to fastener failure. In some cases, the danger associated with this is very real. For instance, if you use such a fastener to fasten a main beam in a house, the failure of the fastener could lead to a collapse of the entire building.

 
Does this mean that it’s absolutely a bad idea to reuse the fasteners?
Simply because there is a risk that you may end up using deformed fasteners does not mean that reusing them is a bad idea. The only thing you need to keep in mind is that to ensure that you use only those fasteners that can work under the conditions you are going to place them, you will need to have them tested by an engineer. This way, those fasteners that have inherent structural deformities can be identified and isolated from the rest.
However, the problem with this is that it can be very complicated. The process of finding the engineer and then having them check each and every one of the fasteners you want to use can be time consuming, and can also be expensive if you have to hire such an engineer.
The final verdict
With the above in mind, it’s easy to see that reusing fasteners is not a good idea at all. Simply buying new ones is recommended, since it’s easier and sometimes cheaper. If you have a large batch of fasteners you want to get rid of, you could decide to sell them to a recycling plant, and then use the money to fund the purchase of entirely new ones. This way, you will have the peace of mind of knowing that the fasteners you used will perform as expected, and that you did not waste the old fasteners. However, if you are still willing to reuse the old fasteners, making sure that they are checked first by a professional should be a top priority.

About the Author

Jennifer Melone
By Jennifer Melone
Purchasing Agent

Started her career in the fastener world in 1991 working at Melfast as a receptionist, also handling clerical duties. Later on she began training in sales and also taking on purchasing duties. She is currently responsible for all purchasing and also is responsible for the sales of many accounts of Melfast.

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