When most people are interested in buying screws, they often go for some of the more popular ones such as the Washer Hex Tek Screw. Granted, these are adequate for most scenarios, and this explains why they are so popular. If you are interested in using the fasteners in such a manner that a lot […]

When most people are interested in buying screws, they often go for some of the more popular ones such as the Washer Hex Tek Screw. Granted, these are adequate for most scenarios, and this explains why they are so popular. If you are interested in using the fasteners in such a manner that a lot of torque would be needed to put them in place, you might need to consider using modified versions of such screws.
The reason for this is that most screws have a threshold when it comes to the amount of torque you can use to put them in place. In a bid to try and make the joint as tight as possible, you may end up damaging the screw. In some cases, this might result in removal of the head, which then means that it would be impossible to remove the head.


Rather than going through all this, you should consider using some of the screw types that are designed to withstand more torque. Some of these include:
The TORX
TORX is a trademark that is used to denote a specific type of head. This can best be described as a screw head with a star shaped depression in it where the driver goes in. One of the major benefits of this design is the fact that it allows high amounts of torque to be supplied to the screw. However, this does not result in any damage in the screw or the tool used to drive it in place. This then makes this one of the cheapest options for high torque screwing options, since it results in prolongation of the lives of both the screw and the screw driver. The star shaped depression in the screw head also reduces the risk of slipping when putting it in place.
TORX Plus
This type of screw head is a slight improvement from the TORX screw, but designed in such a manner that it can withstand a lot more force when being put in place. The main difference between this and the TORX screws is that the edges of the depression on the screw head are flattened at the tips, which allows for better force distribution.
The Washer Hex Tek Screw
hex washer tek screw
A lot of people who use the Washer Hex Tek Screw also find it to be a good candidate for use in instances where the fastener has to be put in place tightly. However, this is subject to a number of issues. The most important of these is the fact that the screw has to be well made. The only way to make sure that this is done is by buying them from a trustworthy vendor.
The TORX Tamper Resistant
This is essentially similar to the regular TORX screw, only that it has a small depression in the middle of the head into which a pin on the screw driver goes. This acts as a tamper resistant mechanism, since the screw drivers that have the central pin are hard to come by.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

Related Posts

See All