Without a doubt, fasteners like screws, bolts, nuts and rivets play an integral role in numerous industrial applications nowadays. From holding product components together to the rubber bands commonly used to secure index cards, fasteners are indispensable in our daily lives. However, given the rapid and continuous evolution of technologies, the need for specialized fasteners […]

Without a doubt, fasteners like screws, bolts, nuts and rivets play an integral role in numerous industrial applications nowadays. From holding product components together to the rubber bands commonly used to secure index cards, fasteners are indispensable in our daily lives. However, given the rapid and continuous evolution of technologies, the need for specialized fasteners becomes imperious. As a result of this demand, nowadays there are numerous types of specialty fasteners available, each designed for a specific purpose.
What are the machine pin fasteners?
A pin fastener is the term used to describe a cylindrical clasp made of steel commonly used to keep the components of industrial machinery in proper alignment or tightly together. The specialty fasteners currently available fall under two main categories, namely the quick-release and the semi-permanent pin fasteners.

As indicated by the general categories, each type of pin fastener implies a different installation. While the quick-release pins are self-contained, the semi-permanent pin needs a pressure tool for both installation and removal. The pins featuring a quick-release device lock into place via a spring-loaded mechanism and are best suited for application involving rapid manufacturing.

The machine pin fasteners recommended for industrial applications
There are several types of specialty pin type fasteners industries benefit from at the moment:

  • Clevis pins

The clevis pins are designed to function as a type of hinge and are best employed in applications that require a mobile connection between two mated components. On a side note, for extra security it is advisable to use cotter pins to attach them in place. They come in handy in situations when a rotation around the shank is required, such as fastening turnbuckels or sailing applications. This is why they can be used in conjunction with a shackle that allows a further connection to another device.

  • Ground dowel pins

Due to their basic small and straight design, the dowel pins are mostly utilized to properly align the component of a machine before fixating them together via other types of fasteners, such as screws for instance. In other words, after aligning the machine’s components as required, they need to be clamped in place with dowel pins while the screw holes are being drilled.

  • Cotter pins

The cotter pins are frequently utilized for holding other fasteners in place, particularly in cases where nuts and bolts are subjected to high amounts of stress and there is the risk they can get damaged. The cotter pins are currently available in 18 different sizes and constitute an ideal choice to use with slotted bolts and screws. Sometimes, these fasteners can be employed for holding clevis pins in places in applications that imply securely attaching parts to shafts.
Taper pin

  • Taper pins

Taper pins can be easily identified by their specific appearance, namely one of the ends has a larger diameter than the other. Depending on the application, the taper pins can include a male screw thread on the smaller end to ensure a better locking of the pin in its position. The taper pins are mostly utilized in mechanical engineering in applications like attaching levers to shafts or fastening wheels to a rod.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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