Sleeve anchors are by far the most versatile fastener and can be employed in a plethora of projects, including those that include concrete as the base material. In fact, they are commonly utilized in securing heavy weighted items of up to 200 pounds to a concrete surface. Even though they make an excellent choice for […]

Sleeve anchors are by far the most versatile fastener and can be employed in a plethora of projects, including those that include concrete as the base material. In fact, they are commonly utilized in securing heavy weighted items of up to 200 pounds to a concrete surface. Even though they make an excellent choice for installing rails on walkways or grab bars for bathrooms – to name a few of their applications – take note that their efficiency is usually directly linked to a proper installation. Still, a correct installation is not the only concern associated with tightening sleeve anchors into concrete, as you are about to find out.
SLEEVE ANCHOR

  • Forgetting to clean the hole prior to the insertion

The importance of cleaning the hole before installing the sleeve anchor cannot be stressed enough. Not only is this step critical for a proper installation, but it is also a guarantee that the anchor will have a maximum holding value. Therefore, do not forget to prepare the insertion spot by removing all potential dust and debris with a wire brush, a vacuum or a compressed air tool.

  • Inadequate installation

In case you did not know, the strong bond between the part and the concrete is ensured by friction. The key to making sure you get a solid bond between the material and the sleeve anchors implies drilling a hole of the right diameter and depth. In the event that the hole is too deep or too wide, then there is a fair chance the anchor will come loose in time and that could lead to serious injuries. In addition to planning all the details before actually drilling the hole, you should also consider applying a small amount of epoxy to hold the anchors in place.

  • Utilizing the wrong type of anchor bolt

While they go by the name of sleeve anchors, keep in mind that there are various categories available, designed for different applications. The cast-in-place bolt is widely used in projects that involve fastening items in concrete due to its special design. Simply put, the head is especially created for a secure and full insertion into concrete, while the thread is left out, making it easier to connect other objects with it.

  • Confusing concrete with a different construction material

Even though the sleeve anchors are a great choice for concrete, it is necessary to underline that they are not a universal tool and may not be as efficient when utilized in conjunction with another material. To put it simply, if you decide to use them with a brick and block base for instance, then there is a fair chance they will damage that surface.

  • Disregarding the safety standards

Irrespective of the type of project in which you need to use the sleeve anchors, do not forget to read and respect the safety standards, a piece of information you can get from the product description. If you choose to disregard the recommendations on load, spacing or embedment, then keep in mind that it could lead to  serious injuries and death because the structure may not be able to withstand a natural disaster or a calamity.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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