Pros And Cons Of Using A Serrated Flange Nut Flange nuts are used for a variety of applications, depending on the style purchased. A serrated flange nut does not offer premium locking capabilities, like flange lock nuts, but does provide several benefits when used in the proper manner. What Are Serrated Flange Nuts? Find the […]

Pros And Cons Of Using A Serrated Flange Nut

Flange nuts are used for a variety of applications, depending on the style purchased. A serrated flange nut does not offer premium locking capabilities, like flange lock nuts, but does provide several benefits when used in the proper manner.

What Are Serrated Flange Nuts?

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A flange nut looks like a standard hex nut  from one side, but the bottom is widened into a circular flange, creating a bell-like shape. Manufacturers serrate the bearing surface of that flange to create serrated flange nuts, allowing for a better grip on the surface of the joint.
Also termed serrated face nuts, spin lock or serrated tooth nuts, this type of fastener provides more resistance to vibration. As the nut is tightened onto the joint, the mating surface is scored by those serrations and a locking fit is achieved.

Cons Of Using A Serrated Flange Nut

This type of locking fastener uses displacement or distortion to provide a tight fit. When used with a painted or coated mating surface, that distortion can increase the risk of corrosion. If moisture could be an issue in your application, consider using another type of locking nut that will not expose the mating surface to corrosion.

Pros of Using A Serrated Flange Nut

Serrated tooth nuts work well for oversized or irregularly shaped holes, since the flange covers any discrepancies and serrations cover the entire bearing surface. They can also be reused without limitations, unlike standard flange lock nuts, although it's wise to check your manufacturer's instructions covering torque values and any lubricants.
You can leave out washers when using this type of nut, since the flange extends the bearing surface and those serrations need direct contact with the mating surface. This may save time and money on your application. You also need slightly less torque when installing this nut, shaving off valuable time during assembly or construction.
You'll find serrated face nuts in most common finishes, including plain and zinc plated. Stainless steel brands are also available and provide optimum protection against the corrosion issue.
If flange nuts are on the specs for your project or you're looking for a simple locking solution, considering whether using a serrated flange nut would provide the strength and resistance required.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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