Essential in grain elevators and other applications involving a vertical conveyor, an elevator bolt connects the bucket to the belt, allowing for dependable operation. When coupled with nylon lock nuts, fanged elevator bolts can be used to create a tighter, more reliable fit. But what are the disadvantages to using this type of elevator bolt […]

Essential in grain elevators and other applications involving a vertical conveyor, an elevator bolt connects the bucket to the belt, allowing for dependable operation. When coupled with nylon lock nuts, fanged elevator bolts can be used to create a tighter, more reliable fit. But what are the disadvantages to using this type of elevator bolt and is it best for your application?
Fanged Elevator Bolt Specifications
This style of fastener is similar to common elevator bolts, formed with a flat, wide head attached to a square shank and threaded bolt with a blunt end. Some lines of fanged elevator bolts have a round shank, but all come with at least two teeth protruding from the bottom of the head.
These fangs engage the joint material and help to eliminate loosening, even under heavy vibration. Nylon lock nuts are also used on the other end to reduce the risk of loosening. When both measures are in place, these fasteners are tight and stable.

Pros of Using the Fanged Style
Grain elevators experience severe vibration and almost constant movement, as do other applications where elevator bolts are used. The fanged style of elevator bolt provides another level of protection against loosening, and can be extremely effective when coupled with a washer and Nylock nut.
The bolt head is secured into the belt via the fanged teeth, which provide a positive grip that prevents bolt head turning. This positive grip also makes it much easier to remove the nut and take off or switch the buckets.
Cons of Using the Fanged Style
Fanged styles tend to be more expensive than standard elevator bolts, and that additional cost can be significant for large grain elevators or major applications. Add in the extra cost for using Nylock nuts in place of standard nuts and the fastener budget climbs even higher. Although the higher costs may be offset over time by a reduction in maintenance, it can be difficult to get approval for a larger initial investment.
A fanged elevator bolt offers superior resistance to loosening, but will require a larger upfront investment. The pros may outweigh the cons for many, but others will use standard elevator bolts with success.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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