Modular buildings are designed for strength, and must meet the stringent standards laid out by national building codes. Standard wood screws are used for certain elements, but the hex lag bolt plays a major role and provides the stability required for modular buildings of all shapes and sizes. What Are Hex Lag Bolts? Lag bolts […]

Modular buildings are designed for strength, and must meet the stringent standards laid out by national building codes. Standard wood screws are used for certain elements, but the hex lag bolt plays a major role and provides the stability required for modular buildings of all shapes and sizes.
What Are Hex Lag Bolts?
Lag bolts with a hex-shaped head are commonly used on wood projects. They are often formed with a gimlet point and may be fully threaded (often called hex lag screws) or formed with a shank.
Most often a hex lag bolt is used without a nut, although it’s certainly possible to use a washer and nut. Lag bolts provide great clamping force and resist loosening based on their design, even without a nut in place.
Most hex lag bolts are made from galvanized steel or zinc-plated steel, although stainless steel lags provide the optimum protection from corrosion. If used on the exterior of a modular building, a stainless steel or silicon bronze hex lag bolt should be specified for better corrosion resistance.

What Types of Modular Buildings Call For Hex Lags?
From small storage shed kits to larger modular garages and modular homes, a wide range of building designs calls for the use of hex lags.
You’ll find hex lag bolts in the floor framing, wall framing and essential joints. Standard wood screws often do not have the load capacity and are not available in the lengths required, so modular building manufacturers turn to hex lags.
You can also find a hex lag bolt or two in the roof structure of many modular homes and prefab sheds and garages. This style of bolt can be easily backed off and tightened to industry specifications and provides the long-term strength that building owners have come to expect.
As the modular building industry continues to expand, the demand for stronger, durable wood fasteners grows. The hex lag bolt is one of the most important common fasteners used on these buildings, and helps these structures meet safety and building standards across North America.

About the Author

Larry Melone
By Larry Melone
President

Started my career in the fastener world in 1969 at, Parker Kalon Corp. a NJ based screw manufacturer located in Clifton, NJ working in inventory control, scheduling secondary production and concluding there in purchasing. In 1971 I accepted a sales position at Star Stainless Screw Co., Totowa, NJ working in inside sales and later as an outside salesman, having a successful career at Star I had the desire with a friend to start our own fastener distribution company in 1980 named: Divspec, Kenilworth, NJ. This was a successful adventure but ended in 1985 with me starting Melfast in August 1985 and have stayed competitive and successful to date. Melfast serves the OEM market with approximately 400 accounts nationally.

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